ECONOMIC BOOM EXPECTED FROM STRONGER TIES WITH ISRAEL

TANZANIA: DIPLOMACY/DAILY NEWS/24/4/18 SABANews 1

Farm Africa trained farmer demonstrates simple but effective sesame seed planter (Pic. Jonathan Banks)

DAR ES SALAAM – TANZANIA says it is working to strengthen bilateral relations with ISRAEL to help boost its own agriculture and other strategic economic sectors.

ISRAELI Justice Minister AYELET SHAKED has been visiting the SADC country, and has attended the TANZANIA-ISRAEL Business and Investment Forum in the commercial capital, DAR ES SALAAM.

She has commended host President JOHN POMBE MAGUFULI for seeking stronger ties with her country, saying the relations are strategic for both TANZANIA and ISRAEL.

Minister SHAKED says TANZANIA is also opening its Embassy in ISRAEL next week; a development she says is a symbol of what the TWO countries can do together.

The DAILY NEWS quotes her as saying ISRAEL is superior in technology and TANZANIA is the superpower in natural resources, endowments that they can combine.

Minister SHAKED says ISRAEL possesses high technology in agriculture, medicine, irrigation, security, and pharmacy.

TANZANIAN officials like the Minister of Industry, Trade, and Investment have displayed excitement at the prospect of increased cooperation with the ISRAELIS.

CHARLES MWIJAGE has told reporters the government has been discussing with ISRAEL issues of agriculture, a sector that is highly developed in ISRAEL.

He says the ISRAELIS are capable of farming even in the desert and producing more crops than people cultivating arable land.

Minister MWIJAGE says TANZANIA wishes for farmers from ISRAEL to help ensure efficient production; given the highly needed ISRAELI expertise in science and technology.

TANZANIA Private Sector Foundation Board Member FELIX MOSHA says the MIDDLE EASTERN country is far ahead in technology and agriculture.

The TANZANIAN official says it will be a great opportunity for local producers to partner ISRAELI farmers.

The FARM AFRICA organisation says most people in TANZANIA are rural small-scale farmers, but about 35 percent of the population does not have enough nutritious food to eat.

It says villagers in the large forests rely on selling timber products like firewood and charcoal to make money, which calls for higher and more sustained agricultural growth to reduce overall poverty.

Expected ISRAELI expertise comes as FARM AFRICA has since 1990 sent out teams to help small-holders, pastoralists and forest communities in TANZANIA become food self-sufficient./Sabanews/cam

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